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3-D Printed Food And Your Health

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Jin-Kyu Rhee, associate professor at Ewha Woman’s University in South Korea. She described her work at the American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology’s annual meeting. This meeting is called,” EXPERIMENTAL BIOLOGY 2018,” was held April 21-25 in San Diego.

Imagine a home appliance that, at the push of a button, turns powdered ingredients into food that meets the individual nutrition requirements of each household member. Although it may seem like something from science fiction, new research aimed at using 3-D printing to create customized food could one day make this a reality.

The Research Team built a platform that uses 3-D printing to create food micro structures that allow food texture and body absorption to be customized on a personal level. One day, people could have cartridges that contain powdered versions of various ingredients that would be put together using 3-D printing and cooked according to the user’s needs or preferences.

3-D printing of food works much like 3-D printing of other materials in that layers of raw material are deposited to build up a final product. In addition to offering customized food options, the ability to 3-D print food at home or on an industrial scale could greatly reduce food waste and the cost involved with storage and transportation. It might also help meet the rapidly increasing food needs of a growing world population.:)

https://www.eurekalert.org/pub_releases/2018-04/eb2-3pf041318.php

http://www.ewha.ac.kr/mbs/ewhakr/index.jsp

http://experimentalbiology.org/2018/Home.aspx

https://medkit.info/2018/04/24/3-d-printed-food-could-change-how-we-eat/

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3D Printing Blood Vessel Networks

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3-D printers can assemble raw materials into very complex products. Researchers had previously fabricated a single blood vessel, which amounted to no more than a long and slender tube. The next hurdle is to create complex, branching networks of blood vessels.

A team of engineers led by Dr. Shaochen Chen of the University of California, San Diego, aimed to improve on current 3-D printers to better engineer complex tissues like blood vessel networks. Their research was supported by NIH’s National Institute of Biomedical Imaging and Bioengineering (NIBIB). Results were published online in advance of the April 2017 issue of Biomaterials.

“Almost all tissues and organs need blood vessels to survive and work properly. This is a big bottleneck in making organ transplants, which are in high demand but in short supply,” says Chen. “3-D bioprinting organs can help bridge this gap, and our lab has taken a big step toward that goal.”

The results show that a complex tissue resembling blood vessels can be formed using a 3-D printer. The ultimate challenge for this research team is to engineer heart tissue with a complex network of blood vessels. Such tissues might be used to replace damaged heart muscle or for drug testing. 🙂

https://ucsd.edu.