Books

3D Printing market forecast until 2030

Posted on Updated on

3D Printing market forecast until 2030.
According to Cramer, says”Before you buy any stock, please, please, do your homework”. I found a book online, the books and education will prevent us from more exposure regarding 3D printing. When we read more we will be more educated ourselves about 3D printing.
We will be more aware the benefits related other important things and the future prospectives.

“How “Fabbing” Will Change Different Industries Until 2030. The Future of 3D Printing in Aerospace, Retail and Healthcare.
Please tell us about your views:)

 

How “Fabbing” Will Change Different Industries Until 2030. The Future of 3D Printing in Aerospace, Retail and Healthcare

https://www.thestreet.com/video/cramers-investing-rule6-do-your-homework-14610072

https://www.reportlinker.com/p03711132/3D-Printing-Metal-Market-by-Form-by-Type-by-Application-and-by-Region-Global-Forecast-to.html

https://www.amazon.com/Different-Industries-Printing-Aerospace-Healthcare/dp/3668027137/ref=sr_1_1?ie=UTF8&qid=1536601481&sr=8-1&keywords=How+%22Fabbing%22+Will+Change+Different+Industries+Until+2030.+The+Future+of+3D+Printing+in+Aerospace%2C+Retail+and+Healthcare

Advertisements

SV3DPrinter’s vision for the ‘99% ENVIRONMENTAL FRIENDLY and GREEN’

Posted on Updated on

SV3DPrinter’s vision for the environment or ‘GREEN’
Nothing is completely green. 3D printing also not 100% environmental friendly or ‘ GREEN’. When we use the word ‘GREEN’ it is coming from the environment we use technology to make it word GREEN.
We all are contributors to make the world not so ‘GREEN’ or ‘POLLUTION’. We are the polluters.
The same thing for 3D Printing we use different material and printers. Using printers we need energy, same kind of energy we use to grow our raw food.
When we use ‘BIODEGRADABLE’ bags for garbage, the companies make those bags and basket, and paper bags too. Making those kinds of things we contribute more pollution.
Some of us eating raw we feel we are green but not. This is the reason people use the broom to sweep outside and inside of their house. They spread more dust and contributed more pollution to the atmosphere.
Whenever new products come in the market we always attract those things and get rid of the old thing, buy new thing even we don’t really need that.
Some of us taking the dogs for the walk, they are contributing more pollution to the atmosphere.
This is similar to use cell phone doing any other regular thing or cooking food at home.
With the 3D printing, we don’t try to waste the material can reuse the material and make any useful thing out of the waste material.
Every day we have some kind of material we call it waste or recycle. We receive junk mail, frozen food boxes, any kind of drinks bottle, or we drive to buy grocery or walk to buy things.
In my opinion, using 3D Printer may be not 100% ‘GREEN’ or environmental friendly but we can try to make it ‘99% ENVIRONMENTAL FRIENDLY and GREEN’. We need to have more understanding about Additive Manufacturing:)

Silicon Valley’s SV3DPrinter’s vision

Privacy Policy

 

3D-printed lattice for bone repair

Posted on Updated on

When I was a little kid, one of my foot had the plaster cast for 2 months, I was unable to walk properly because it was stiff and thick.
I think it will be good for people who need a cast for any injury.
Some of the comments on the video, I am using different video and different comments for my post.

I am giving you just an idea.
Please check the link for more information. I can’t find the video for those things.
The biggest problem with this is the holes in the cast. I recently have a broken scaphoid and they cut a hole in the cast as a port for a bone stimulator. They had to fashion a plug for the hole and I need to wear a tensor bandage there to keep the swelling from pushing out at the hole. A cast doesn’t have holes in it for a very good reason – to contain swelling. No Doctor would design this.
This is just another use of a 3D printer, that’s all and it is not ‘revolutionary’ at all. Moreover, you’d need to scan the patient’s limb – we are all different. Then there is time. A hospital will have this done in ten minutes, so how long before this comes out of the printer? Another thing is that you have to clean up a 3D print, or it has rough edges left on it – rather you than me! Then ether is the cost. Are they trying to tell us that this much 3D print filament costs less than plaster?
According to Dr Jeffers and Renishaw, which is one of the world’s leading engineering and scientific technology companies, with expertise in precision measurement and healthcare, the partnership between Imperial College London and Renishaw is creating really exciting data on new materials that can control the way bone repairs itself these materials could change the way orthopaedic implants are designed in the future, and certainly provide an opportunity to improve patient outcomes by repairing the musculoskeletal system with materials that can invoke the desired response in bone.
On display at the show will be a portfolio of additive manufacturing builds to showcase what can be achieved on the Renishaw platform with Beta type capability. The builds include lattice structures which are more complex, in terms of resolution and density, than anything that can usually be achieved using traditional manufacturing techniques”.

http://www.renishaw.com/en/engineering-at-renishaw–40474

A Farewell to Printrbot

Quote Posted on Updated on

It’s with a heavy heart that we must report Printrbot has announced they are ceasing operations. Founded in 2011 after a wildly successful Kickstarter campaign, the company set out to make 3D printing cheaper and easier. Their first printer was an amalgamation of printed parts and wood that at the time offered an incredible deal; when the Makerbot CupCake was selling for $750 and took 20+ hours to assemble, the Printrbot kit would only run you $500 and could be built in under an hour. Printrbot got their foot in the door early, but the competition wasn’t far behind. The …read more

via A Farewell to Printrbot — Hackaday