3D bioprinting

Disabled Wisconsin Duck walks with 3D Printed Feet

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Disabled Wisconsin Duck walks with 3D Printed Feet

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A duck named Phillip lost his feet to frostbite in Wisconsin.  He was found by a teacher Vicki Rabe-Harrison who first considered euthanizing him considering his condition.  Instead, she contacted Jason Jischke, a middle school teacher who had a 3D printer in his class.  Jason asked her not to put Phillip down.  Jason worked with his students to develop feet for Phillip.  After multiple attempts, finally they managed to 3D print feet that fit Phillip.  Phillip struggled initially with the prosthetic feet but figured out fast how to use them.  He got a second life thanks to his 3D printed feet.  Phillip now lives in Wisconsin’s Autumn Farm Sanctuary, near Lake Michigan with other duck friends.

 

http://www.independent.co.uk/news/world/americas/phillip-duck-3d-printed-feet-disabled-wisconsin-autumn-farm-animal-sanctuary-a6992656.html

 

http://www.al.com/news/index.ssf/2016/04/wisconsin_duck_named_phillip_g.html

 

 

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3D Printing Blood Vessel Networks

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3-D printers can assemble raw materials into very complex products. Researchers had previously fabricated a single blood vessel, which amounted to no more than a long and slender tube. The next hurdle is to create complex, branching networks of blood vessels.

A team of engineers led by Dr. Shaochen Chen of the University of California, San Diego, aimed to improve on current 3-D printers to better engineer complex tissues like blood vessel networks. Their research was supported by NIH’s National Institute of Biomedical Imaging and Bioengineering (NIBIB). Results were published online in advance of the April 2017 issue of Biomaterials.

“Almost all tissues and organs need blood vessels to survive and work properly. This is a big bottleneck in making organ transplants, which are in high demand but in short supply,” says Chen. “3-D bioprinting organs can help bridge this gap, and our lab has taken a big step toward that goal.”

The results show that a complex tissue resembling blood vessels can be formed using a 3-D printer. The ultimate challenge for this research team is to engineer heart tissue with a complex network of blood vessels. Such tissues might be used to replace damaged heart muscle or for drug testing. 🙂

https://ucsd.edu.