Systematics of Manufacturing Technologies

A 3D printed li-ion battery

Posted on Updated on

I am concerned about writing anything related to Lithium. So I did research about it. I found out some favorable research about Lithium.
Please do the judgment for our reader’s.
According to Battery University, “Because of the inherent instability of lithium metal, research shifted to a non-metallic lithium battery using lithium ions. Although slightly lower in energy density, the lithium-ion system is safe, providing certain precautions are met when charging and discharging. Today, lithium-ion is one of the most successful and safe battery chemistries available. Two billion cells are produced every year”.

At the same time, according to Physics researchers at Virginia Commonwealth University,” they also found that the electrolytes in lithium-ion batteries (also known as Li-ion batteries) could be replaced with halogen-free electrolytes that are both nontoxic and environmentally friendly”.

According to Engadget,” A 3D printed li-ion battery is one of the challenges in creating smaller and smaller devices these days, such as wearables and phones, is that the batteries can take up a lot of room. Cases are often designed around standard battery sizes, and it often creates wasted space. Now, new research published in ACS Applied Energy Materials shows that it’s possible to 3D-print lithium-ion batteries into whatever shape you need”.

 

 

https://news.vcu.edu/article/Liion_batteries_contain_toxic_halogens_but_environmentally_friendly

https://batteryuniversity.com/learn/archive/lithium_ion_safety_concerns

Advertisements

3D Print Metallic Glass

Posted on Updated on

 

Yale Professor Jan Schroers and his graduate students have developed some unique uses for metallic glasses, a particularly tough metallic alloy that can be molded into useful products (like cell phone cases) at relatively lower temperatures and pressures. According to Yale Professor Jan Schroers and his research team,” they used a new approach to 3D print objects from the metallic glass a relatively new material stronger than even the best metals, but with the pliability of plastic”.

 

https://seas.yale.edu/news-events/news/better-way-3d-print-metallic-glass

 

https://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S1369702118303663

https://www.sciencedirect.com/topics/materials-science/thermoplastic

 

Hierarchical 3-D Printing of Nano porous Gold

Posted on Updated on

According to Chris Spadaccini the director of LLNL’s Center for Engineered Materials and Manufacturing, “There are a whole lot of scientific and engineering challenges left, but it could have the significant impact, scaling up should be easier with small-scale reactors because you can parallelize. You could have an array of small 3-D reactors together instead of one large vessel enabling you to control the chemical reaction process more effectively. The Monolithic nanoporous metals, derived from dealloying, have a unique bicontinuous solid/void structure that provides both large surface area and high electrical conductivity, making them ideal candidates for various energy applications”.

 

https://www.ecnmag.com/news/2018/09/hierarchical-3-d-printing-nanoporous-gold-could-revolutionize-electrochemical-reactor-design

https://www.llnl.gov/news/lab

US Marines construct 3D-printed concrete barracks

Posted on Updated on

US Marines construct 3D-printed concrete barracks in U.S. Army Engineer Research and Development Center in Champaign, Illinois.

According to the Marine Corps Capt. Matthew Friedell, AM project officer in MCSC’s Operations and Programs/G-3,” the team used a design model on an old computer, concrete, and a 3D printer. The concrete was then put through the 3D printer. It took approximately 40 hours to complete the barracks hut. If there was a robot to do the mixing and pumping, the building could easily be created in one day. This capability would enable a great partnership with the local community because it is low cost, easy to use, and robotics could print the buildings.”

 

https://www.marines.mil/News/News-Display/Article/1611532/mcsc-teams-with-marines-to-build-worlds-first-continuous-3d-printed-concrete-ba/