3D Print University

3-D Printing Ice Cream(3D Printed Food recipe (Chew ))

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Graduate students learned how to 3-D print ice cream in an additive manufacturing course at MIT.

According to John Hart, the Mitsui Career Development Associate Professor in Contemporary Technology and Mechanical Engineering at MIT,” says early education on 3-D printing is the key to helping the technology expand as an industry. I very much enjoyed creating and teaching the course and I’m proud of what the students did, and what it means about the future potential of additive manufacturing. The students’ final projects have included printers that they built specially to print molten glass and even soft-serve ice cream”.

http://news.mit.edu/2016/mit-course-3-d-printing-101-0511

 

 

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Housing construction with 3D concrete printers

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According to Professor Jay Sanjayan, the Swinburne University of Technology,” Each block of this freestanding structure is printed using a special cement composite. Rather than factory conditions, we have to print out in the weather.

Instead of a few kilos of materials, we have to handle tonnes. And although we don’t need the same accura­cy as the aerospace industry, we have to trade that for the low cost.”

 

http://theconversation.com/3d-concrete-printing-could-free-the-world-from-boring-buildings-106520

https://www.swinburne.edu.au/news/latest-news/2018/08/pioneering-housing-construction-with-3d-concrete-printers-at-swinburne.php

WSU researchers 3D printed glucose biosensors

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WSU researchers create 3D-printed glucose biosensors. According to Arda Gozen and Yuehe Lin, faculty in the School of Mechanical and Materials Engineering, the research has been published in the journal Analytica Chimica Acta,” 3D printing can enable manufacturing of biosensors tailored specifically to individual patients. This can potentially bring down the cost. For large‑scale use, the printed biosensors will need to be integrated with electronic components on a wearable platform. But, manufacturers could use the same 3D printer nozzles used for printing the sensors to print electronics and other components of a wearable medical device, helping to consolidate manufacturing processes and reduce costs, even more.

Our 3D printed glucose sensor will be used as the wearable sensor for replacing painful finger pricking. Since this is a noninvasive, needleless technique for glucose monitoring, it will be easier for children’s glucose monitoring”.

3D‑printed glucose biosensors created by WSU

https://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0003267018310705?via%3Dihub

3D-Printed implants help grow real bone

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3D-Printed implants help grow real bone.
According to the researchers Paulo Coelho, DDS, MD, and Bruce Cronstein, MD,” explain that chemically coated, ceramic implants successfully guided the regrowth of missing bone in lab animals while steadily dissolving, which could benefit wounded veterans and children living with skull deformations since birth. Learn more about their work, recently featured in the Journal of Tissue Engineering and Regenerative Medicine”.

 

https://nyulangone.org/press-releases/three-dimensional-printed-implants-shown-to-help-grow-real-bone