Technology

4D printing Programmable Textiles

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According to the comments from the videos, ” 4D printing Programmable Textiles looks like, Lays potato chips are made. Once they’re produced on 3D printers, objects made of programmable materials continue to take shape, folding, unfolding or assembling themselves in response to outside stimuli such as light, movement, heat, pressure or water.

The programmable Materials consist of material compositions that are designed to become highly dynamic in form and function, yet they are as cost-effective as traditional materials, easily fabricated and capable of flat-pack shipping and self-assembly. These new materials include self-transforming carbon fiber, printed wood grain, custom textile composites and other rubbers/plastics, which offer unprecedented capabilities including programmable actuation, sensing and self-transformation, from a simple material”. 🙂

https://selfassemblylab.mit.edu/programmable-materials/

https://internetofthingsagenda.techtarget.com/feature/4D-printing-is-the-catchphrase-programmable-materials-the-newsmakers

 

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Custom building envelopes straight from the 3D printer

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According to Moritz Mungenast, he is Associate Professor of Architectural Design and Building Envelope, “Custom building envelopes straight from the printer and not only is the facade element very stable, it’s also translucent and multi-functional. For example, cells inside the element provide stability while at the same time creating air-filled cavities for optimum insulation. Waves in the material create shadows. Thin embedded tubes let air circulate from one side of the element to the other, ensuring the best possible ventilation. And the micro-structured surface provides for perfect acoustics. All these functions are scalable and can be adapted to accommodate individual requirements at no extra cost”.

 

 

https://www.tum.de/en/about-tum/news/press-releases/detail/article/34151/

New 3D printing material

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According to the Sculpteo,” New 3D printing material is Urethane Methacrylate (UMA 90) resin (UMA 90) is a very stiff and strong 3D printing material. The 3D printed parts created with this new resin material developed by Carbon are comparable to injection molded plastics, which makes it a really interesting material to develop prototypes but also resistant finished products. One of the main advantages of this material is its smooth surface. Indeed, objects 3D printed using this resin are naturally smooth and you don’t need post-treatments similar to the ones you need with Nylon PA12 parts”.

 

https://www.sculpteo.com

https://www.sculpteo.com/en/materials/clip-resin-material/

A Farewell to Printrbot

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It’s with a heavy heart that we must report Printrbot has announced they are ceasing operations. Founded in 2011 after a wildly successful Kickstarter campaign, the company set out to make 3D printing cheaper and easier. Their first printer was an amalgamation of printed parts and wood that at the time offered an incredible deal; when the Makerbot CupCake was selling for $750 and took 20+ hours to assemble, the Printrbot kit would only run you $500 and could be built in under an hour. Printrbot got their foot in the door early, but the competition wasn’t far behind. The …read more

via A Farewell to Printrbot — Hackaday