3D printing market and technology, research

3-D Printed Food And Your Health

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Jin-Kyu Rhee, associate professor at Ewha Woman’s University in South Korea. She described her work at the American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology’s annual meeting. This meeting is called,” EXPERIMENTAL BIOLOGY 2018,” was held April 21-25 in San Diego.

Imagine a home appliance that, at the push of a button, turns powdered ingredients into food that meets the individual nutrition requirements of each household member. Although it may seem like something from science fiction, new research aimed at using 3-D printing to create customized food could one day make this a reality.

The Research Team built a platform that uses 3-D printing to create food micro structures that allow food texture and body absorption to be customized on a personal level. One day, people could have cartridges that contain powdered versions of various ingredients that would be put together using 3-D printing and cooked according to the user’s needs or preferences.

3-D printing of food works much like 3-D printing of other materials in that layers of raw material are deposited to build up a final product. In addition to offering customized food options, the ability to 3-D print food at home or on an industrial scale could greatly reduce food waste and the cost involved with storage and transportation. It might also help meet the rapidly increasing food needs of a growing world population.:)

https://www.eurekalert.org/pub_releases/2018-04/eb2-3pf041318.php

http://www.ewha.ac.kr/mbs/ewhakr/index.jsp

http://experimentalbiology.org/2018/Home.aspx

https://medkit.info/2018/04/24/3-d-printed-food-could-change-how-we-eat/

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Disabled Wisconsin Duck walks with 3D Printed Feet

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Disabled Wisconsin Duck walks with 3D Printed Feet

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A duck named Phillip lost his feet to frostbite in Wisconsin.  He was found by a teacher Vicki Rabe-Harrison who first considered euthanizing him considering his condition.  Instead, she contacted Jason Jischke, a middle school teacher who had a 3D printer in his class.  Jason asked her not to put Phillip down.  Jason worked with his students to develop feet for Phillip.  After multiple attempts, finally they managed to 3D print feet that fit Phillip.  Phillip struggled initially with the prosthetic feet but figured out fast how to use them.  He got a second life thanks to his 3D printed feet.  Phillip now lives in Wisconsin’s Autumn Farm Sanctuary, near Lake Michigan with other duck friends.

 

http://www.independent.co.uk/news/world/americas/phillip-duck-3d-printed-feet-disabled-wisconsin-autumn-farm-animal-sanctuary-a6992656.html

 

http://www.al.com/news/index.ssf/2016/04/wisconsin_duck_named_phillip_g.html

 

 

First Running Shoes with 3D Printed Midsoles from New Balance

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First Running Shoes with 3D Printed Midsoles from New Balance

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New Balance announced launch of the first high performance running shoes with 3D printed midsoles.  The shoes will be first launched in Boston in April 2016.  Subsequently they will be launched in select locations worldwide.  New Balance is collaborating with 3D Systems for this product.  The midsoles are 3D printed using selective laser sintering (SLS) process that uses a powder called DuraForm® Flex TPU.

 

New Balance started using 3D printing technology for shoes in 2013.  With this announcement, they are bringing 3D printing technology to commercially available shoes.  According to Robert DeMartini, President and CEO of New Balance, “With 3D printing we are able to pursue performance customization at a whole new level. The New Balance Innovation Team is showcasing the latest in performance running and these advancements signify an important step forward to becoming one of the world’s top athletic brands.”

http://www.newbalance.com/article?id=4041

http://www.newbalance.com/press-releases/id/press_2013_New_Balance_Pushes_Limits_of_Innovation_with_3D_Printing.html

 

TechCrunch Article on 3D printed midsoles from New Balance

McLAREN DEPLOYS STRATASYS ADDITIVE MANUFACTURING TO IMPROVE 2017 CAR PERFORMANCE

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Formula 1 cars race at very high speeds – up to 227 mph (365 km/h)– utilizing power units that reach a maximum of 15,000 revolutions per minute (RPM). We  love McLAREN cars. They are awesome. (please drive safely and not too fast, please don’t text and drive).

McLAREN deploys STRATASYS additive manufacturing to improve 2017 car performance. They 3D-printed a structural bracket to attach the hydraulic line on the MCL32 race car using Stratasys FDM technology, leveraging a Fortus 450mc Production 3D Printer with carbon-fibre-reinforced nylon material (FDM® Nylon 12CF).

“They are consistently modifying and improving our Formula 1 car designs,” said Neil Oatley, Design and Development Director, McLaren Racing. “So the ability to test new designs quickly is critical to making the car lighter and, more importantly, increasing the number of tangible iterations in improved car performance.

“If we can bring new developments to the car one race earlier – going from new idea to new part in only a few days – this will be a key factor in making the MCL32 more competitive. By expanding the use of Stratasys 3D printing in our manufacturing processes, including producing final car components, composite lay-up and sacrificial tools, cutting jigs, and more, we are decreasing our lead times while increasing part complexity.”

“Formula 1 is one of the world’s best proving grounds for our additive manufacturing solutions,” said Andy Middleton, President, Stratasys EMEA. “As the Official Supplier of 3D-Printing Solutions to the McLaren-Honda Formula 1 team, we are working closely together to solve their engineering challenges in the workshop, in the wind-tunnel, and on the track. We believe that this, in turn, will enable us to develop new materials and applications that bring new efficiency and capability to McLaren Racing and other automotive designers and manufacturers.”

http://www.mclaren.com/formula1/partners/stratasys/mclaren-deploys-stratasys-additive-manufacturing-improve-2017-car-performance/