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Pitt Engineers Receive $1 Million for 3D printed turbine component

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Pitt Engineers Receive $1 Million for 3D printed turbine component. The three-year project has received additional support from the University of Pittsburgh ($200,600), resulting in a total grant of $1,003,000.

U.S. Energy Secretary Rick Perry today announced that the Department of Energy will award 113 grants totaling $121 million to 103 small businesses in 29 states.

According to Albert and Dr.Xiayun (Sharon) Zhao, Ph.D., assistant professor of mechanical engineering and materials science at Pitt, “LPBF AM is capable of making complex metal components with the reduced cost of material and time. There is a desire to employ the appealing AM technology to fabricate sophisticated HGPTCs that can withstand higher working temperature for next-generation turbines. However, because there’s a possibility that the components will have porous defects and be prone to detrimental thermomechanical fatigue, it’s critical to have a good quality assurance method before putting them to use. The quality assurance framework we are developing will immensely reduce the cost of testing and quality control and enhance confidence in adopting the LPBF process to fabricate demanding HGPTCs.”

 

 

Pitt Engineers Receive $1 Million to Develop Better Quality Control for 3D Printing Turbine Components

3D Printing News Alert(3D printed flexible mesh for ankle and knee braces)

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3D printed flexible mesh for ankle and knee braces. According to Sebastian Pattinson, who conducted the research as a postdoc at MIT and associate professor of mechanical engineering A. John Hart, “This work is new in that it focuses on the mechanical properties and geometries required to support soft tissues.3-D-printed clothing and devices tend to be very bulky. We were trying to think of how we can make 3-D-printed constructs more flexible and comfortable, like textiles and fabrics. The beauty of this technique lies in its simplicity and versatility. Mesh can be made on a basic desktop 3-D printer, and the mechanics can be tailored to precisely match those of soft tissue.”

http://news.mit.edu/2019/3-d-print-mesh-ankle-knee-braces-0619