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3D printed Tiny robots

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Tiny robots activated by magnetic fields may be used in future biomedical procedures.
According to Professor Eric Diller (MIE), researchers at the U of T,” they create magnetized microrobots. The size of the head of a pin that can travel through fluid-filled vessels and organs within the human body. Previously, we would prepare one shape and manually design it, spend weeks planning it, before we could fabricate it. And that’s just one shape. Then when we build it, we would inevitably discover specific quirks — for example, we might have to tweak it to be a little bigger or thinner to make it work. If we were taking samples in the urinary tract or within fluid cavities of the brain — we envision that an optimized technique would be instrumental in scaling down surgical robotic tools”.
According to Tianqi Xu, he is MIE MASc candidate, “These robots are quite difficult and labor-intensive to fabricate because the process requires precision. Also because of the need for manual assembly, it’s more difficult to make these robots smaller, which is a major goal of our research”.

 

No assembly required: U of T Engineering researchers automate microrobotic designs

The 3D print shell of a 4-bedroom house in 24 hours

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The 3D print shell of a 4-bedroom house in 24 hours using

The large-scale 3D concrete printer.

According to Dr. Paul Tinari,” a demonstration of the 3D printer in Burnaby on Thursday. The beauty about this is that it can build a house of any size.

Tinari said his technology could build livable homes today, but one needs to subject it to testing and building code legislation needs to change.
he hopes to soon build homes on a First Nation reserve on Vancouver Island, where provincial and federal building codes don’t apply. He also says his invention would be perfect for rebuilding communities hit by natural disasters, including parts of California ravaged by wildfires”.

https://www.cbc.ca/news/canada/british-columbia