Carbon3D Raises $100M from Google Ventures and Others

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Carbon3D Raises $100M from Google Ventures and Others

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In June, 2015 we wrote about Carbon3D and its Continuous Liquid Interface Production technology (CLIP), that grows parts rather than printing them layer by layer as done by conventional 3D printers.  Carbon3D recently closed a $100M series C round of funding lead by Google Ventures.  Reinet Investments spokesman Anton Rupert said, “After evaluating Carbon3D’s CLIP technology, we believe it is a game-changer for complex manufacturing across many global market segments.”  According to Andy Wheeler, General Partner at Google Ventures, “Carbon3D’s technology has the potential to dramatically expand the 3D printing market beyond where it stands today and reshape the manufacturing landscape.” Carbon3D, a Silicon Valley based company, was founded in 2013.

 

https://embed-ssl.ted.com/talks

/joe_desimone_what_if_3d_printing_was_25x_faster.html

http://carbon3d.com/

http://venturebeat.com/2015/08/20/carbon3d-raises-100m-from-google-ventures-and-others-to-help-manufacturing-embrace-3d-printing/

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Continuous_Liquid_Interface_Production

http://sv3dprinter.com/2015/06/04/polymer-based-3d-printing-from-carbon 3d/

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18th Expo Osaka (DMS Osaka)

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18th Expo Osaka (DMS Osaka). This is 18th DMS Osaka Expo for Design Engineering and Manufacturing, It has solutions for CAD,  3D printer measurement  zone.

OCT 7 – 9, 2015

http://www.dms-kansai.jp/en/

FDA Approves the first 3D Printed Drug from Aprecia Pharmaceuticals

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FDA Approves the first 3D Printed Drug from Aprecia Pharmaceuticals

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For the first time, US Food and Drugs Administration (FDA) has approved a 3D printed drug.  According to Aprecia Pharmaceuticals announcement,” that FDA has approved their SPRITAM levetiracetam drug used for certain types of epileptic seizures.  Aprecia uses a ZipDose platform that creates pills by combining multiple layers of powdered medication.  This 3D printing (3DP) technology is based on research performed at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT).  The 3D printed pill has a porous, water-soluble matrix that rapidly disintegrates with a sip of liquid.  This enables heavy doses of medication to be administered with a small sip of liquid.  This improves the patient experience.  Patients who have difficulty swallowing have a greater chance of missing a dose of the medicine.  Missed dose of medicine often leads to seizures.  Ease of administration of the medication helps manage the diseases better.  According said Don Wetherhold, Chief Executive Officer of Aprecia “By combining 3DP technology with a highly prescribed epilepsy treatment, SPRITAM is designed   to   fill   a  need for   patients who struggle with   their   current   medication experience.”

https://www.aprecia.com/pdf/2015_08_03_Spritam_FDA_Approval_Press_Release.pdf

https://www.aprecia.com/

http://www.spritam.com/

https://www.aprecia.com/zipdose-platform/3d-printing.php

 

 

MIT Develops Platform for 3D Printing Glass

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MIT Develops Platform for 3D Printing Glass

Mediated Matter Group of MITs’ Media Lab in collaboration with MIT’s Department of Mechanical Engineering and MIT’s Glass Lab has developed an additive manufacturing platform called G3DP for printing transparent glass structures.  The G3DP platform uses two chambers, an upper chamber and a lower chamber.  The upper chamber is heated to a temperature of 1900°F to produce molten glass.  The lower chamber performs annealing by slowly cooling the molten glass.  The molten glass is funneled through a nozzle to 3D print fascinating glass structures.

According to Prof. Neri Oxman of the MIT Media Lab who directs the Mediated Matter research group, this research could lead to advances in creating fiber optic cables that transmit data more efficiently.

https://www.media.mit.edu/people/neri

http://matter.media.mit.edu/

https://www.media.mit.edu/research/groups/mediated-matter

https://wp.me/p64ptu-4d

http://online.liebertpub.com/doi/pdfplus/10.1089/3dp.2015.0021