Environment-friendly sustainable 3D print Prototyping with the Oceans Plastics Engineering Projects

5D Printer Halo

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We already know about 3D, 4D, 5D Printing previously. Now we are learning more about 5D printing. This is made in India Halo 5D Printer. The Bengaluru-based company, Etherial Machine has come up with a 3D printing technique like no other. 5D printer won the Best of Innovation CES 2018 Award.
5D printing can be better called 5-axis printing, where there are five distinct axes along which the printer head moves. This allows for far more complex structures to be printed, while also enabling much stronger construction. Here’s how it work.
The benefits of 5D Printing is more than regular 3D printing. Because objects that are 3D printed are technically made out of slices of flat layers. The layers are flat, the object can have some weak points. When we use 5D printing, the curved layers prevent creating weak points.

According to MERL’s scientist ( Mitsubishi Electric Research Labs ) William Yerazunis, Ph.D. Senior Principal Research Scientist of this lab explained,” Tests that have been made with 5D printed objects by MERL showed that these objects were 3 to 5 times stronger than if it had been 3D printed. MERL explained the difference in strength by comparing a bicycle to a motorcycle. MERL pressurized two identical plastic printed pressure caps, one created with 3D printing and the other with 5D printing. The 3D printed cap could only handle 0.1 megapascals of pressure – so, about 1 second before it burst.
5D printing, for example, a concave cap, an item that could not be 3D printed because it needs a lot of fillers and support, plus whose design is too complex. Below you can see an example of a 5D printed concave cap and you will directly understand how the shape didn’t allow for horizontal 3D printed layers.:)

 

https://www.sculpteo.com

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3D print Engineering with Arduino

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Would you like to make your cell phone or mp3. Arduino is an open-source hardware, software and content platform with a global community. It’s intended for anyone making interactive projects.

the Arduino board started changing to adapt to new needs and challenges, differentiating its offer from simple 8-bit boards to products for IoT applications, wearable, 3D printing, and embedded environments.

According to David Cuartielles, he is Arduino’s Co-founder, “Back in 2012, I was given the challenge of bringing project-based learning to my first group of upper secondary schools in Spain. I realized at the time that almost no one was addressing the needs of educators when introducing curriculum. Therefore, I decided that we had to put educators at the center of our concept and help them find creative ways to use technology in the classroom. Arduino Education is not just about making interesting projects with students, it is also about getting acquainted with developing technologies and new methods of teaching.”.

 

https://www.arduino.cc

 

3D printed scaffolds with turmeric

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The WSU research team improved bone-growing capabilities on 3D-printed, ceramic bone scaffolds by 30-45 percent when coated with curcumin, a compound found in the spice, turmeric. They have published their work in the journal,
Turmeric has been used in Asia for thousands of years and is a major part of Ayurveda. Turmeric has been shown to have antioxidant, anti-inflammatory and bone-building capabilities.
According to Susmita Bose, Herman and Brita Lindholm Endowed Chair Professor in the School of Mechanical and Materials Engineering, “As a mother and having a chemistry background, I realized I didn’t want my children to be exposed to so many chemicals for every illness,” Bose said. “I started looking at home remedies.”
she always emphasizes healthy living as the best way to guarantee the best health outcomes, including healthy eating, proper sleep, interesting hobbies, and exercise.:)

Osteoporosis Protocol Review

http://www.sciencenewsline.com

Natural cures combined with biomedical devices prompt bone health, growth

3D Printing from Recycled Ocean Plastic

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3D Printing from Recycled Ocean Plastic is for better future.  PlasticBank.org has printed the world’s first 3D printing filament from recycled ocean plastic. The plastic from the shorelines of Alaska, the sorting, recycling and a successful print from HPDE which is a very difficult plastic type for 3D printing.

Selecting a hard to print but commonly found plastic type was an important part of the Plastic’s for Change program. The extruder technology was developed at the University of British Columbia (UBC). The Plastic Bank is turning plastic waste into a currency in developing countries.

A large part of The Plastic Bank’s life improvement program is to empower the world’s poor to become micro-recycling/manufacturing entrepreneurs by providing access to 3D printing. All Alaska footage was courtesy of Dudes on Media for National Geographic.