Advanced Materials Technologies

The bone repairing with 3D Print

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The bone repairing is very important. Due to the age and other factors, bones suffer from bone defects and disorders.
According to the Journal of Materials Chemistry,”The aim of this study is to set out to solve these problems by applying a modified 3D-printing method to prepare highly uniform CS scaffolds with controllable pore structure and improved mechanical strength. The in vivo osteogenesis of the prepared 3D-printed CS scaffolds was further investigated by implanting them in the femur defects of rats. The results show that the CS scaffolds prepared by the modified 3D-printing method have uniform scaffold morphology. The pore size and pore structure of CS scaffolds can be efficiently adjusted. The comprehensive strength of 3D-printed CS scaffolds is around 120 times that of conventional”.

 

https://www.asia-u.ac.jp/english/information/search/

http://pubs.rsc.org/en/content/articlelanding/2012/jm/c2jm30566f#!divAbstract

https://www.ntuh.gov.tw/en/default_P.aspx

http://english.cmu.edu.tw/

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Custom building envelopes straight from the 3D printer

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According to Moritz Mungenast, he is Associate Professor of Architectural Design and Building Envelope, “Custom building envelopes straight from the printer and not only is the facade element very stable, it’s also translucent and multi-functional. For example, cells inside the element provide stability while at the same time creating air-filled cavities for optimum insulation. Waves in the material create shadows. Thin embedded tubes let air circulate from one side of the element to the other, ensuring the best possible ventilation. And the micro-structured surface provides for perfect acoustics. All these functions are scalable and can be adapted to accommodate individual requirements at no extra cost”.

 

 

https://www.tum.de/en/about-tum/news/press-releases/detail/article/34151/

3D Printed device for injured spinal cords

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According to Ann Parr, M.D., PhD., a co-author of the study and University of Minnesota Medical School Assistant Professor in the Department of Neurosurgery and Stem Cell Institute,”This is a very exciting first step in developing a treatment to help people with spinal cord injuries. Currently, there aren’t any good, precise treatments for those with long-term spinal cord injuries.”

https://interestingengineering.com/tiny-3d-printed-device-could-save-injured-spinal-cords

3D printing to understanding Influenza virus

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According to Dr Strappe he is working as Senior Lecturer in Medical Laboratory Science at CQUniversity for 20 years’ in Molecular Virology, “The CQUni has a state-of-the-art 3D printing facility which is largely used for engineering applications, however, the Medical students will use this technology to begin to understand concepts about how viruses are formed and enter cells, and how parts of the virus can be targets for therapeutic intervention.
Viruses cannot be seen with the naked eye and working with pathogenic viruses is untenable for undergraduates. 3D printing allows scaling up of the structure of these viruses so students can learn more about virus structure and shape, and relate these features to pathogenesis and recent outbreaks. For example, we are in the middle of a flu epidemic and from printing a high-resolution influenza virus we can highlight the part of the virus (haemmagluttin) that changes every year, causing new outbreaks and the need for annual vaccination. This project exposes medical science students to engineering concepts such as computer-aided design and advanced manufacturing, which they normally wouldn’t encounter in their degree. This helps students to think beyond the confines of their own subject and develop interdisciplinary skills which students will need in the field.”

 

https://www.cqu.edu.au/cquninews/stories/general-category/2017/cqu-students-use-3d-printing-to-get-close-to-understanding-influenza-virus