Month: August 2019

3D Printed spinal, chest implant

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According to Jani Nuolikoski, “I like all the new features. The new UI is looking nice and professional. All alignment tools for Fixed Scan are powerful and give completely new opportunities to speed up the scanning process in the field.“

SOUTH KOREA’S MANTIZ JOINS 3D PRINTED SPINAL IMPLANT MARKET

WorldSkills Kazan 2019

SHINING 3D and 3D Systems Partner to Release Geomagic® Essentials™

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More than 3000 highly inspiring followers and amazing guest writers with 1000 posts.

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The 3D printers contribution to save the environment, with rebuilding ceramic corals reefs

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The 3D printer’s contribution to saving environment rebuilding ceramic corals reefs.
According to Ezri Tarazi, an industrial design professor at the Technion—Israel Institute of Technology, who is collaborating with other researchers from his university, Ben-Gurion University of the Negev, and Bar-Ilan University on the project, “As a diver, I was seeing the early signs of this five years ago. I was thinking, how can we take a reef that’s totally collapsing—which means there are no branches of corals anymore because they collapse, and fish cannot hide—and how can we reignite life in it? Because I’m an industrial designer, the idea to print corals was the first thing coming to mind.”

 

The 3D printers contribution to save the environment, with rebuilding ceramic corals reefs

ISRAELI RESEARCHERS ARE USING 3D PRINTING TECHNOLOGY TO HELP REBUILD CORAL REEFS 

 

Can we print a new set of coral reefs before they’re gone?

 

A 3D-printed transparent skull implant

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A 3D-printed transparent skull implant.
According to Suhasa Kodandaramaiah, Ph.D., a co-author of the study and University of Minnesota Benjamin Mayhugh Assistant Professor of Mechanical Engineering in the College of Science and Engineering “What we are trying to do is to see if we can visualize and interact with large parts of the mouse brain surface, called the cortex, over long periods of time. This will give us new information about how the human brain works. This technology allows us to see most of the cortex in action with unprecedented control and precision while stimulating certain parts of the brain.”

According to Kodandaramaiah and Ebner, the research team was led by fourth-year mechanical engineering Ph.D. student Leila Ghanbari. The research team included several post-doctoral associates, graduate students and undergraduate students including Russell E. Carter (neuroscience), Matthew L. Rynes (biomedical engineering), Judith Dominguez (mechanical engineering), Gang Chen (neuroscience), Anant Naik (biomedical engineering), Jia Hu (biomedical engineering), Lenora Haltom (mechanical engineering), Nahom Mossazghi (neuroscience), Madelyn M. Gray (neuroscience) and Sarah L. West (neuroscience). The team also included partners at the University of Wisconsin including researcher Kevin W. Eliceiri and graduate student Md Abdul Kader Sagar, “This new device allows us to look at the brain activity at the smallest level zooming in on specific neurons while getting a big-picture view of a large part of the brain surface over time. Developing the device and showing that it works is just the beginning of what we will be able to do to advance brain research.”

A 3D-printed transparent skull implant

University of Minnesota block M and wordmark

Research Brief: 3D-printed transparent skull provides a window to the brain

Transparent 3D-Printed Skull Implant Opens New Window for Brain Researchers

U.S. Air Force – The first approved project was printed on the Stratasys F900

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According to Travis release,” The first approved project was printed on the Stratasys F900, can print parts with dimensions up to 36 inches x 24 inches x 36 inches made of Ultem 9085, a specialized plastic known for its extra flexibility, density and strength. The 60th Maintenance Squadron at Travis AFB, Calif., is the Air Force’s first-ever field unit to be equipped with a Federal Aviation Administration- and USAF-certified 3D printer capable of producing aircraft parts. Typically, parts that don’t keep the aircraft from performing their mission don’t have as high as a priority for replacement.”
According to MSgt. John Higgs, the squadron’s metals technology section chief, in the release, “We already have a list from the Air Force level to help them print and to backfill some supplies. This will ensure other bases can replace items sooner than expected with our help.”

Travis Maintenance Squadron First to Produce Certified, 3D-Printed Parts

Why Investments in 2020 Additive Manufacturing?

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Why Investments in 2020 Additive Manufacturing?
Are Likely to Increase in 2020.
According to ETFs consumers initially saw 3D printers as a “factory in every home, but they soon came to realize that the items they produced weren’t functional. As the hype fizzled out, new fears emerged in the manufacturing segment, and some companies using 3D printers saw year-over-year declines in their revenue. The rise and fall of additive manufacturing took place over a few short years, but that wasn’t the end of the story.”

According to TriLine“The share of renewables in meeting global energy demand is expected to grow by one-fifth in the next five years to reach 12.4% in 20232. RENW aims to offer long-term exposure to the growing future of energy,”

Additive manufacturing is on an upward trajectory as of late. This resurgence is due to the fact that the list of possible 3D-printable materials has more than doubled in the last five years.”

According to Dean Franks, the head of global sales at the additive manufacturing company, Autodesk, “believes that consumer products, industrial machinery, automotive and tooling applications are the growth opportunities for additive manufacturing. He believes that these industries will start to grow as the more established aerospace, medical and dental markets continue to grow.”
According to Bertrand Humel van der Lee, the Chief Customer Operations Officer at EOS, “predicts that 3D printing within healthcare will flourish because there is an increase in demand for personalized healthcare, treatments, and medical devices.”
According to the Morningstar North America Renewable Energy Index, which is designed, “to provide exposure to companies that operate across the full renewable energy supply chain, including renewable energy innovators, suppliers, adopters, and end-users.”
According to TriLine Index Solutions, the index and ETF development arm of Boone Pickens Capital Fund Advisors.”

Total 3D-Printing Index

The 3D Printing ETF Can Make A Comeback

Why Investments in Additive Manufacturing Are Likely to Increase in 2020

The world’s first 3D printed brake caliper

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The world’s first 3D printed brake caliper.
According to
Volkswagen Group, “The world’s largest 3D printed titanium pressure functional component ever produced on one of the most powerful brake test benches on the market! This is what it looks like when Bugatti prepares its first printed titanium brake caliper for series production.”

From comments,

Niels Cremer
Niels Cremer
7 months ago
Can 3d print brake calipers, can’t take higher frame rates for slow motion footage.

Reaper5.56 Xx
7 months ago
Can you 3d print better emission test.

Bassam Al-Rawi
7 months ago
Which 3D printer was used 😁

Qwerrrz
7 months ago
Looks like 3d printing just reached a new level. That’s insane.

Insert coolname
7 months ago
This is nothing new. I´ve seen 3D printed brake calipers in Formula Student cars.
vaporainwaves
7 months ago (edited)
I am pretty sure koenigsegg was faster to produce a functional 3D printed component from titanium. Outrageous.

MOTO-079
7 months ago
3d printed… still needs machining or are the brake pistons just gliding on a printed serves…

Callen Hurley
7 months ago
3D printing is the future of production.

Phar2Rekliss
7 months ago
Now lets see what 3D printed Inconel 750 parts can handle! Inconel is the next step level in material from Titanium for these kinds of purposes.

eLike
7 months ago
This brake caliper is made in ABS, people with a 3D printer will understand this.

Gavin 363
7 months ago
I’d be more impressed if the rotor was 3d printed.

Zachary Gamble
7 months ago
Not sure I would want a 3D printed caliper on my million dollar car.
SPIRIT01
7 months ago
Cnc machine is like a 3d metal printer , been around for a couple of years , idk I thought brembo and ceika , and all those other big brake kits I thought they had already printed out calipers.

sam sl
7 months ago
Just because things are 3D printed does not mean they are better.

kym516
7 months ago
Just saying, other manufacturers may have tested this idea before. I mean a 3d printed caliper can have lighter weight and better thermal control which is obvious enough for researches to be done. But still, good marketing peace of work. Hope this amazing technology can be used on consumer cars.

Boris Diamond
7 months ago
How hot was the calliper getting and how much was it deflecting? Mechanical properties are reduced at high temperatures, it’s impressive that it survived the test but I would like to know if it yielded or not and how many high load/temperature cycles it is capable of. It should be ok being Ti.
Oddvin Lorenzo Preinstad
7 months ago
3d printed car parts are probably normal in the future, imagine if your car breaks down and you have it brought to a mechanic. Today that mechanic has to order the parts which will take at least multiple days, with 3d printed parts it is a matter of hours,
.

Bugatti speeds up testing on its 3D-printed titanium brake caliper

Bugatti 3D printed titanium brakes to stop its $3 million Chiron supercar

Jabil’s plan for $42M medical 3D printing with 24 percent core EPS growth

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According to St. Petersburg-based Jabil (NYSE: JBL),” is set to make a $42 million investment in Albuquerque, New Mexico for technology and equipment as it makes the Duke City its “center of excellence” for 3D printing, officials announced on Aug. 15. The company said it plans to hire 120 employees in the next five years.”
According to New Mexico Gov. Michelle Lujan Grisham said in a statement “We have all the talent in the world right here in New Mexico, and when we build the infrastructure for a 21st-century economy, we will see more young adults stay here and more homegrown talent return here.”
According to CEO Mark Mondello, “I’m extremely pleased with our third-quarter performance, highlighted by solid operational excellence and strong financial results. The team delivered 20 basis points of core margin expansion on double-digit revenue growth, culminating in an impressive 24 percent core EPS growth, year-over-year. Our strong year-to-date results validate that our diversification strategy has firmly taken hold.”

Delivering insoles in 1/2 the time, at a fraction of the cost.

3D Printing Breaking Through the Barriers in Manufacturability

JABIL

Medical Device Mechatronics

Jabil Unveils Plans for $42M Medical 3D Printing Center of Excellence

Jabil unveils plans for $42M medical 3D printing center of excellence

Jabil: Florida manufacturing giant announces plans to invest $42M, create 100+ jobs in New Mexico

Florida manufacturing giant announces plans to invest $42M, create 100+ jobs in New Mexico