Month: July 2019

Legal issues in additive manufacturing.

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Legal issues in additive manufacturing.
According to Professor of Engineering Design and Manufacturing and director of the AMD program Timothy W. Simpson, Paul Morrow “Additive manufacturing is disrupting product design and how we manufacture parts. It’s also disrupting how we protect our intellectual property. Most engineers are not prepared to think about the impact this will have on how their company will deliver new products and services with AM.”
According to Christopher Higgins, partner and co-leader of the 3D Printing Group at Orrick, Herrington & Sutcliffe LLP,” As an engineer, having an understanding of legal issues that may arise in additive manufacturing can make you an invaluable asset to a company. It is a skill set that most engineers do not have when exiting school, which makes this course a unique opportunity at Penn State.”
According to Brenna McCornac, a student currently enrolled in the course and an additive manufacturing engineer at Cumberland Additive, “As a working engineer, I feel that this is a valuable knowledge base to have. I don’t believe that many engineers have the opportunity to learn a lot about the law, especially within their specific field. Those of us participating in this class will be uniquely equipped to work effectively in a corporate setting or start their own business, having a good basis of legal knowledge pertaining to additive manufacturing.”

First-of-its-kind graduate course tackles legal issues in additive manufacturing

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3D printers in or near rural health facilities

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According to HESE director John Gershenson, “For too long, people have lacked access to appropriate medical care just because of where they were born. Now, the entire world will know that Penn Staters are helping to right that wrong. We’ve been exploring the idea of installing these 3D printers in or near rural health facilities, training staff members and local entrepreneurs there how to use them and creating the necessary support systems. If these facilities can make those hard-to-get items for themselves, they could keep running their facility the way they need to rather than having to import everything from other countries.”

For rural areas in Kenya, healthcare accessibility has been and continues to be, a growing concern—one that the Kijenzi venture hopes to solve by providing accessible and affordable medical education tools.

According to Ben Savonen, “this is a very experimental project, but, as some of the components of its work out, it will have a huge impact.”

https://wp.me/p64ptu-2tg

Kijenzi is one of many ventures in the Humanitarian Engineering and Social Entrepreneurship program that approaches real-world issues with Penn State know-how.

Sand 3D Printer before and now

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According to Sculpteo, “Binder Jetting printers spread a layer of the material and then bind it with an agent, which solidifies the particles. A layer for sand 3D printer is 140-200 micrometers.”
According to Markus Kayser,” he talks about ‘desert manufacturing’: a combination of solar power and 3D printing to create objects made entirely out of the sand. As a product designer, he has created a variety of beautiful objects only using the sun and sand.”
According to ExOne’s digital part materialization,” (3D printing) process for printing sand casting molds and cores, beginning with a digital file, going through solidification analysis, printing and finally casting a finished industrial part.”
Comments 4 years ago,
also side topic, I still think bricks made from lava would be a good cheap way to get building materials, you could scoop lava into brick molds with industrial robots and also if you push a magnetic field thru the lave as it cools you could leave a build signature in the structure, that could be used in the future to date and specify where it was made sort of like a bar code but magnetic. but still, lava is still a good material that is underused.
According to AFS MCTV, “I want to see it get to the point where a 3D printer in a desert would be able to print the components for another printer.
This webinar covers the basics of additive manufacturing as well as explains the technology used to create molds and cores with a 3D printer. Led by Dave Rittmeyer and Steve Murray, both of Hoosier Pattern, the webinar will give attendees full access to two industry veterans who have worked in metal casting for a combined 50 years. Attendees will have the opportunity to ask questions, learn from industry experts and see examples of how 3D printed sand has been used within the metal casting industry.”
According to Meimad3, “World’s largest commercial 3D printer (printing volume 4x2x1 meters) – for printing Sand-Cast mold parts for the metal cast.”
According to General Foundry Service, “3d Printed Sand Molds.”
The webinar will cover the basics and explore how to utilize 3D printed sand components on your next project.
Category
7 months ago
You could print big columns in low spots to serve as pilings. Then, you can cap the area with a walking machine so the structure doesn’t get buried. Over time, the additional capped ground will develop a white color which reflects the sun. You could print tunnels and bury them so they stay cool.
The 3rd Sand Printer is Here!
https://wp.me/s64ptu-9486

 

Is a sand 3D printer the future of Additive Manufacturing?

3D-printing a lunar base

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According to European Space Agency, ESA, “Could astronauts one day be printing rather than building a base on the Moon? In 2013 ESA, working with industrial partners, proved that 3D printing using lunar material was feasible in principle. Since then, work continues to investigate the technique. The shielding against radiation provided by a 3D-printed block of simulated lunar regolith was measured, providing important inputs for next-stage designs.”
According to ESA(Now),” astronaut Luca Parmitano has arrived on the International Space Station following a six-hour flight in the Russian Soyuz MS-13 spacecraft alongside NASA astronaut Drew Morgan and Roscosmos cosmonaut Alexander Skvortsov.”

From comments,

4 years ago

This is all good except the “3d printing material” should be the regolith itself melted by focused solar energy. This way the printers could print an inexhaustible™ supply of infrastructure from roads to sinks to rail-launch systems and so on. You would want one specialized printer for printing the things that can’t be made from regolith. (control circuits, actuators, etc.)

I really hope NASA and ESA team up to explore the rest of our solar system and beyond.

3Years ago
Nice, would be able to put an observatory on the moon and make it a refuel station for further travel and a back up for rescue if needed also can make a shipbuilding/repair station safer launches don’t have to fight the gravity and atmosphere burn up, can also make a relay station put a full array of satellites on the moon.
It would be simpler and cheaper to ship high explosives to the moon and use them to excavate a cylindrical chamber into the side of a large crater (like building a tunnel on earth) and then seal off the end, pressurize, and occupy. Much roomier, more protection from radiation and meteor impacts. This 3-D printer idea is dull and uninspiring.
This is great news potentially. I hope one day we can live in space or the moon.

Now
2019: HASSEL wants to print a 3D mars base.

 

Why 3D printing could be key to a Moon base

 

ESA’s Purpose

MEET ASTRONAUT LUCA PARMITANO

The Lightyear One is 3D printed

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More than 55 interior parts for the Lightyear One are 3D printed.
According to Lex Hoefsloot, CEO of Lightyear announces and Robert Llewellyn, ” gets an exclusive first look at the Lightyear One hyper-efficient luxury sedan, a partially solar-powered electric car. And gets to experience it as one of the first passengers!

When Solar Team Eindhoven won the world solar challenge in Australia driving a 4 seater 100% solar-powered car over 3,000 kilometers, no one would have believed that a handful of years later they could come up with this.
Lightyear One. A spacious hyper-efficient partially solar-powered electric car.
We know the future is electric, could it be solar electric.”

 

 

 

 

Always charging in the sun. Longest range. Most sustainable.

Fabbaloo

The Year of Neri Oxman Is (Practically) Upon Us — Architectural Digest

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SFMOMA has announced that architect, designer, and MIT professor Neri Oxman will receive a prestigious award this fall

via The Year of Neri Oxman Is (Practically) Upon Us — Architectural Digest

3D-printable magnetic Droplets devices

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According to a team of scientists at the Department of Energy’s Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (Berkeley Lab), “Scientists Print 3D-printable liquid magnetic droplets devices.
This is a new material that is both liquid and magnetic, opening the door to a new area of science in magnetic soft matter. Their findings could lead to a revolutionary class of printable liquid devices for a variety of applications from artificial cells that deliver targeted cancer therapies to flexible liquid robots that can change their shape to adapt to their surroundings.”
According to Tom Russell, a visiting faculty scientist at Berkeley Lab and professor of polymer science and engineering at the University of Massachusetts, Amherst, “We’ve made a new material that is both liquid and magnetic. No one has ever observed this before. This opens the door to a new area of science in magnetic soft matter.”

 

New Laws of Attraction: Scientists Print Magnetic Liquid Droplets

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Massachusetts. Your future is here

Awesome to be green:)

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Awesome to be green:)
3D printing technology to be fully Eco-friendly.3D printing technology uses large amounts of energy, larger than the amount used by milling and drilling machines.
If you think about failed prints you may somehow eventually recycle the plastic.
Plastics products may take up to a thousand years to compost while PLA products compost within 3-6 months in a composting system.
PLA-  is made from renewable sources, such as starch – corn, potatoes, soy protein, cellulose, and lactic acid, cassava, sugarcane or sugar beet pulp, all of them are compostable, but this process is only considered “composted” The material breaks down into carbon dioxide, water, and biomass.
3D printing waste happens –

when sometimes layers aren’t sticking together properly in mid-print and depending on the model’s geometry it might cause a failure.
This could be because you’re 3D printing at a temperature that’s a bit too low.
Precaution-

Increase the print temperature slightly and ensure those layers fuse into each other.
In 3D printing, two most common filaments to print with are ABS plastic, PLA, polyamide (nylon), glass filled polyamide, stereolithography materials (epoxy resins), silver, titanium, steel, wax, photopolymers, and polycarbonate.
3D printing uses sustainable manufacturing method. Because it reduces waste.
Later its applications range from medical devices to aerospace — and possibly even drinking water.
ABS – is a thermoplastic that is great for 3D printing because of its strength and durability. This material is not biodegradable or compostable but can be recycled.
ABS (Acrylonitrile Butadiene Styrene), which Lego is made from, is a safe plastic. BabyBjorn also uses ABS – it’s BPA free. Plastics made from corn starch resin are lumped into the #7 category, and these are BPA free too.
Nylon –  is BPA free, and it’s a #7.
These numbers are for which plastics are healthier for you and more easily recyclable?

4 Ways to Recycle Failed 3D Prints

What do the numbers on plastics mean?

#1 plastics: PET or PETE (polyethylene terephthalate)(Is it safe? -No)
#2 plastics: HDPE (high-density polyethylene)(Is it safe?- YES)

#3 plastics: PVC (polyvinyl chloride or plasticized polyvinyl chloride)(Is it safe?- NO)

#4 plastics: LDPE (low-density polyethylene)(Is it safe?-YES)

#5 plastics: PP (polypropylene)(Is it safe?- YES)

#6 plastics: PS (polystyrene)(Is it safe?-NO)

#7 plastics: other (all other plastics, including acrylic and nylon)(Is it safe?- NOT SURE)

If you want to reuse any material

Use precautions-

can re-heat the material to use it again in a filament recycler.
If we like to do some craftwork, get a ‘ProtoCycler’ and make your filament.
https://redetec.com/
ProtoCycler+
ReDeTec Protocycler – OMG it works!

This kind recycler will smash failed prints into smaller pieces, melt them down, and force the liquid plastic through an opening.

 

 

RECYCLING WITH STRATASYS

What do the numbers on plastics mean?

Fabbaloo

Filabot 3D Printing Recycling Company Logo

The 3D Printer Filament Recycler’s Guide

 

3D printing startup company Fortify raises $10 million

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The Fortify was founded on research on composite 3D printing by Randall Erb and Joshua Martin at Northeastern University. Their goal was to enable quick and seamless fabrication of composites with optimized microstructures. Through their research, they invented magnetic 3D printing or Fluxprint.
Fluxprint makes high-performance materials accessible. It’s a patented magnetic 3D printing process that creates optimized composites.
Fluxprint combines magnetics and digital light processing (DLP) 3D printing to produce composite parts with ideal mechanical properties”.

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What is Fluxprint?

Industrial 3D printing startup Fortify raises $10 million

3D printing and model helped to separate conjoined twins Safa and Marwa

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3D printing and model helped to separate conjoined twins Safa and Marwa.
According to Great Ormond Street Hospital and Charity, After consultation with their doctors in Pakistan, Great Ormond Street Hospital welcomed them to Bumblebee Ward in autumn 2018 and set about a four-month four-stage separation process involving multiple specialties across the hospital – from craniofacial, neurology and psychology experts, to nurses, radiologists, and physiotherapists”.

 

 

Great Ormond Street Hospital

Separating conjoined twins

Conjoined Twins Separated with Help of 3D Printing