Month: June 2019

‘TripleCell’ shoe soles

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According to Katherine Petrecca, New Balance General Manager of Footwear at the Innovation Design Studio,” New Balance and Formlabs take a giant step forward in delivering on this vision with the announcement of TripleCell: a premium technology platform powered by Formlabs stereolithography (SLA) 3D printers and completely new material, Rebound Resin. TripleCell 3D printed shoe sole.”

MEN’S MADE IN USA SNEAKERS

New Balance and Formlabs Collaborate to Drive Footwear Performance and Customization

Leading the Future of Performance Products With Customized Manufacturing

New Balance uses 3D-printed soles in the latest shoe designs

ew Balance’s Latest Shoes Come With 3D-Printed Soles

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Fourth Industrial Revolution technology in ‘Sierra Leone’

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According to the President Julius Maada Bio,” the West African country of Sierra Leone used a 3D printer to create a map of Sierra Leone with the distribution of the number of girls not attending primary schools across the country. The idea evolved over lunch at State House where senior government officials were discussing the status of education within the country.”
According to the head of UK’s Department of Foreign International Development Mary Hunt, “the fact you can pick it up and turn it around to see different aspects of the map makes you feel like you are there – in Kenema, Kabala, or Bonthe – seeing the challenges in peoples lives and what needs to change. I was so drawn to its clarity and potential I had to ask the President if I could take it with me I wanted to share it with others.”
This is the ‘Fourth Industrial Revolution technology’.

 

https://www.weforum.org/agenda/2019/06/sierra-leone-3d-printing-model-state/

http://www.sierra-leone.org/

Growing human hair in a dish using 3D printing

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Growing human hair in a dish using 3D printing.
According to Angela Christiano, Ph.D., the Richard & Mildred Rhodebeck Professor of Dermatology at Columbia University Vagelos College of Physicians and Surgeons, “Our previous studies implicated JAK-STAT signaling as one potential new therapeutic pathway for hair loss disorders by targeting hair follicle stem cells with JAK inhibitors. A biotech company recently reported results of a small phase 2 trial of a topical JAK-STAT inhibitor based on these studies. Here, we show that blocking the source of the JAK activating signal outside the hair follicle is another way to target this mechanism.”

 

 

https://www.cuimc.columbia.edu/news/studies-uncover-new-approaches-combat-hair-loss-men-and-women

https://www.cuimc.columbia

Beyond nature, 3D printed Wood tissue

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According to the Professor Paul Gatenholm, who has led this research within Chalmers University of Technology’s Wallenberg Wood Science Centre and researchers at Chalmers University of Technology, Sweden,” have succeeded in 3D printing with a wood-based ink in a way that mimics the unique ‘ultrastructure’ of wood. Their research could revolutionize the manufacturing of green products. Through emulating the natural cellular architecture of wood, they now present the ability to create green products derived from trees, with unique properties – everything from clothes, packaging, and furniture to healthcare and personal care products.
This is a breakthrough in manufacturing technology. It allows us to move beyond the limits of nature, to create new sustainable, green products. It means that those products which today are already forest-based can now be 3D printed, in a much shorter time. And the metals and plastics currently used in 3D printing can be replaced with a renewable, sustainable alternative.”

https://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S2352940718304918?via%3Dihub#fig0025

http://www.chalmers.se/en/departments/chem/news/Pages/Mimicking-the-ultrastructure-of-wood-with-3D-printing-for-green-products.aspx

https://newatlas.com/wood-nanocellulose-3d-printing/60347/

3D printed resistive soft sensors

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According to related publications from Shih B., Christianson C., Gillespie K., Lee S., Mayeda J., Huo Z., Tolley M. T. (2019), “Design considerations for 3D printed, soft, multi-material resistive sensors for soft robotics. Frontiers in Robotics and AISubmersible robots are finding ever-increasing uses in search and rescue, environmental monitoring, and defense applications. Artificial muscles made out of dielectric elastomer actuators (DEAs) provide an attractive choice for driving submersible robotics based on their high energy density, lightweight, and efficiency. One challenge for most DEAs is that that they require conductive electrodes that are made out of materials that are challenging to the pattern, opaque, and/or add stiffness to the devices.”

 

 

https://sites.google.com/eng.ucsd.edu/bioinspired/

https://drive.google.com/file/d/1vxUw_KLXNnTDJvj2UAQSwp7zPBFQ-061/view

3D Printing latest news(Carbon’s fundraising now more than $680 million)

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Carbon’s fundraising now more than $680 million. According to Dr. Joseph DeSimone, Carbon’s CEO and Co-Founder, “With the Carbon Platform, powered by our Digital Light Synthesis™ technology, companies are finally breaking free of the constraints of traditional polymer manufacturing methods to make what’s next now and at speeds and volumes never before possible.
According to Greg Penner, Founder and General Partner at Madrone Capital Partners and Chairman of Walmart, “What impresses me about Carbon is their diversification across markets and industries. Through their partnerships with large-scale manufacturers in automotive, healthcare, and consumer goods, they are proving that, with their Digital Light Synthesis™ technology, additive manufacturing in larger scale production is becoming a reality across industry sectors. This is an inflection point for the company, and we’re proud to be able to contribute to Carbon’s future success.”

According to Jim Goetz, Partner at Sequoia Capital, “Carbon has cracked the code on 3D printing at scale, as evidenced by its impressive growth in implementation and products brought to market with companies such as Adidas, Ford, Lamborghini, and Riddell. They are truly delivering on their vision to provide the world’s first fully integrated digital manufacturing platform for high-volume production, and they are well on their way to transforming the 3D printing world.”

https://wp.me/p64ptu-2r7

https://www.carbon3d.com/news/

https://www.bloomberg.com/news/videos/2019-06-25/how-carbon-uses-3d-printing-to-transform-the-global-supply-chain-video

Cellulose-Based, 3D Printed IoT Sensors

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According to Simon Fraser University professor Woo Soo Kim, “this novel wireless chemical sensing platform technology will usher various sensing applications such as biomedical or environmental detection.
If we are able to change the plastics in PCB to cellulose composite materials, recycling of metal components on the board could be collected in a much easier way.”

According to Wiley Online Library, “A 3D printable conductive ink is designed and optimized with cellulose nanofibers by addition of silver nanowires for sustainable and biocompatible sensor applications. Polyimide film which has high surface hydrophobicity is used as a substrate for better resolution of printing.”

https://www.thomasnet.com/insights/researchers-develop-cellulose-based-3d-printed-iot-sensors/

https://www.sfu.ca/mechatronics/people/faculty/woosoo_kim.html

https://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/abs/10.1002/aelm.201800778

3D Printing learning, modifying

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According to Jonathan Torta, a self-professed and his sister, Stephanie Torta, a designer, and the author, “technical jack-of-all-trades,” remembered the very first MakerBot kit he acquired and assembled. It was the little wooden ‘Cupcake’ that was very basic. It rattled all over the place, but it could print things. Mesmerized, he’s been “building and modifying 3D printers ever since. I thought that was pretty cool.”

http://www.merclearning.com/titles/3D_Printing_An_Introduction.html

https://steamuniverse.com/articles/2019/06/20/9-things-to-know-about-3d-printing-in-k12.aspx?m=1

3D Printing News Alert(Toybox-The 3D Printer Just For Kid)

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According to Mashable shop and Yahoo finance,” You may have had some fun toys growing up, but even the most nostalgic adult would admit that the Toybox 3D Printer blows their childhood toys out of the water. Designed as an easy-to-use, 3D printer for kids, ToyBox empowers kids to design and print their very own toys—no adult assistance required! It can be controlled with simple one-touch functions and doesn’t require a knife to remove prints like most 3D printers. Using the companion app, kids can choose from ever-expanding toy catalog or create and upload their own designs for infinite possibilities.”

 

 

 

<iframe src=”https://mashable.com/videos/blueprint:3bokNj3l7M/embed/?player=offsite” width=’640′ height=’360′ />

 

https://shop.mashable.com/sales/toybox-3d-printer?

https://finance.yahoo.com/news/save-3d-printer-kids-lets-090000376.html

3D Printing News Alert(For 3D printing a wonder material for the future, graphene)

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Graphene is strong, light, thin and flexible. It is the thinnest substance capable of conducting electricity, is an efficient thermal conductor and is optically transparent. Graphene is also more resistant to tearing than steel and is almost impermeable.

For 3D printing a wonder material for the future, graphene.

According to GrapheneCa Head of Business Development David Robles,” Proactive Investors to discuss the technology company that is integrating graphene into the real world using their own environmentally friendly production process.

Robles telling Proactive about the company’s revenue streams and when they are expecting to be profitable.”

According to Hodge,” Adding graphene to plastic composites can improve the tensile strength and stiffness of packaging. Graphene won’t make the material indestructible but it may be possible to reduce packaging size while maintaining the same properties. This has obvious advantages for transporting fragile goods and may also contribute to recycling. Today, recycling plastics degrades the quality of the plastic – it can be recycled an average of three times, but adding graphene to recycled plastics can improve its strength so that it can be recycled many times more. Because they are printed, [the capacitive touch sensors] can be any size or shape and printed in volume.”

According to Chris Jones, technical manager at Novalia, a partner in the EU’s Graphene Flagship, “Our mission statement is to make technology disappear into everyday items.
The ink is supplied by Researchers at the University of Cambridge, University of Manchester and produced by micro fluidization.”

According to Francesca Rosella, co-founder of CuteCircuit, “A dress was designed to illustrate the material’s strength, transparency, and conductivity. The shape and decoration of the dress represent the design of a graphene crystal. We examined graphene under a microscope to see the hexagonal structure and enlarged it to help people understand graphene’s molecular structure.”

According to the TechRadar, “Mobile warming the graphene jacket can also conduct electricity, but creator Vollebak has decided to dampen down this ability to protect wearers. Prototypes of the jacket were so conductive that the wearer could hold a battery in one hand and a light bulb in the other, and have the bulb light up, but Vollebak decided that, although interesting, it was best to play it safe and make the material a little more resistant.”

According to Researchers at Osaka Universities co-author Kazuhiko Matsumoto,” Our biosensor enables highly sensitive and quantitative detection of bacteria that cause stomach ulcers and stomach cancer by limiting its reaction in a well-defined microvolume. They have invented a new biosensor using graphene, which is a material that consists of a one-atom-thick layer of carbon, to detect bacteria like those that attack the stomach lining and that have been linked to stomach cancer. When the bacteria interact with the biosensor, chemical reactions are triggered which are detected by graphene. To enable detection of the chemical reaction products, the researchers used microfluidics to contain the bacteria in tiny droplets that are close to the surface of the sensor.”

https://wp.me/p64ptu-2qz

 

https://youtu.be/IesIsKMjB4Y

 

 

https://eandt.theiet.org/content/articles/2019/06/graphene-what-is-it-good-for/

https://www.techradar.com/news/with-this-graphene-jacket-youll-never-be-too-hot-too-cold-or-too-smelly

https://www.sciencetimes.com/articles/22914/20190622/using-graphene-and-tiny-droplets-to-detect-stomach-cancer-causing-bacteria.htm

3D Printed Wristwatch

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According to Print Your Environment,” Concept build for a 3D printed modular watch. Made up of 3 printed and interchangeable parts (for different designs and colors) to create many different combinations. Designed in Fusion 360, printed at 0.06 mm layer height on Ultimaker 3. Finished and assembled.
3D Printed Wristwatch”.

https://www.adylinn.com