Month: May 2019

Concrete ceiling using 3D sand-printing

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According to researchers at ETH Zurich,” have fabricated an 80 m2 lightweight concrete slab at the DFAB House, making it the world’s first full-scale architectural project to use 3D sand printing for its formwork”.

 

 

 

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3D printed Tiny robots

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Tiny robots activated by magnetic fields may be used in future biomedical procedures.
According to Professor Eric Diller (MIE), researchers at the U of T,” they create magnetized microrobots. The size of the head of a pin that can travel through fluid-filled vessels and organs within the human body. Previously, we would prepare one shape and manually design it, spend weeks planning it, before we could fabricate it. And that’s just one shape. Then when we build it, we would inevitably discover specific quirks — for example, we might have to tweak it to be a little bigger or thinner to make it work. If we were taking samples in the urinary tract or within fluid cavities of the brain — we envision that an optimized technique would be instrumental in scaling down surgical robotic tools”.
According to Tianqi Xu, he is MIE MASc candidate, “These robots are quite difficult and labor-intensive to fabricate because the process requires precision. Also because of the need for manual assembly, it’s more difficult to make these robots smaller, which is a major goal of our research”.

 

No assembly required: U of T Engineering researchers automate microrobotic designs

Carbon IPO Watch

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We all love 3D printing. Maybe we are still learning and exploring about 3D printing. We have enough knowledge and research on 3D printing.
At the beginning of 2014, we had very little resources. Now in 2019, we have so many 3D printing companies and universities research work.
We are using 3D printing in everyday life. We don’t know what is 3D printed stuff or not 3D print.
We have healthcare, related to 3D print we even don’t know.
We are learning about new technology day by day. More we read more we get an education.
It is been so many years. 3D printing companies are growing and blossoming:)

According to the Fox News,” An initial public offering (IPO) looks as if it could be approaching for Carbon, the Silicon Valley-based 3D printing unicorn that exploded onto the tech scene Opens a New Window. in 2015 and is probably best known for partnering with Adidas (NASDAQOTH: ADDYY) to produce running shoes with 3D-printed midsoles Opens a New Window.
Carbon’s co-founders were inspired to develop [DLS] by the robotic assassin T-1000 from the movie Terminator 2, which rises from a pool of liquid metal to assume the form of any person or object. Indeed, DLS “grows” polymer parts continuously from a pool of liquid resin by harnessing ultraviolet light and oxygen. The tech can be considered a close cousin of stereolithography, which 3D Systems invented”.
According to the Forbes and Carbon’s co-founder and CEO Joe DeSimone, “3-D Printing Unicorn Carbon, On Way To Expected IPO, Drops Resin Prices In Move CEO Calls seminal moment. It would help enable more widespread adoption of 3-D printing at scale. It’s not prototyping anymore, it’s production”.

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https://www.foxbusiness.com/markets/carbon-ipo-watch-is-the-3d-printing-unicorn-preparing-to-go-public

https://www.forbes.com/sites/amyfeldman/2018/11/12/3-d-printing-unicorn-carbon-on-way-to-expected-ipo-drops-resin-prices-in-move-ceo-calls-seminal/#3b57c8d8375d

3D-printed bathroom

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NTU Singapore develops technology that can 3D-print a bathroom unit within a day
According to Assoc Prof Tan Ming Jen,” 3D-printing a bathroom unit could help manufacturers halve their production time while lowering transport costs, carbon emissions, and materials wastage. Less space is required to create and store the same number of PBUs in land-scarce Singapore since conventional PBUs take about two weeks before they can be ready.

By being able to print-on-demand, companies can save on their inventory costs as well as manpower costs, as they don’t have to hold as much stock and their workers can be redeployed to do higher-level tasks. This approach improves the safety of the workplace since robots are doing the construction of the bathroom unit.

According to team lead from Sembcorp Design and Construction, and Sembcorp Architects & Engineers Er Lie Liong Tjen, “3D printing technology allows concrete to be printed and customized. The complicated shape of a PBU and its walls can be developed and printed at a faster pace to satisfy the needs of individual customers as no formwork or molds are required, whereas conventional construction of PBUs with concrete or lightweight wall panels always limit the possibilities of design. In addition, 3D printing can build curvilinear profiles rather than rectilinear forms”.

https://media.ntu.edu.sg/NewsReleases

https://www.ntu.edu.sg

Ashley furniture using 3D printers

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ARCADIA, Wis. Ashley Furniture Inds. is using 3D printers in its manufacturing facilities.
According to Vaughn Pieters, senior director of case good operations, “We’re doing 10% more business out of our Arcadia facility alone with probably almost 15% less labor. Automation has really allowed us to remove some of that heavy physicality. We don’t have employees doing that heavy bulk work all day long anymore. We let the machine do that, so the employees can use their minds and try to better the process”.
According to Ashley,” It’s using printers from Boston-based 3D printing unicorn Formlabs in several of its manufacturing facilities, printing about 700 3D parts, so the machines are able to work right alongside the industrial robots from assembly to fabrication”.

 

https://www.ashleyfurniture.com/

https://www.furnituretoday.com/technology/ashley-furniture-uses-3d-printing-on-factory-floor/

3D Printing News Alert(3D-printed costumes at ASU)

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3D-printed costumes take center stage at ASU.

According to Victor Surovec, program coordinator for the maker services and Sarah Lakenau,”The ‘teeth’ on this breastplate were created in a 3D printer using a scan of a real tooth from a grizzly bear, according to Sarah Lakenau, clinical assistant professor of costume technology in the School of Film, Dance, and Theatre at ASU.
I emphasize to my students that they should use technology to solve a problem.
There was a time you did have to be in a profession to have the skill set to run some of this equipment, but now, the usability of some of this stuff has gotten to a level where I teach a 6-year-old to design and print in 3D”.

 

https://www.asu.edu/

3D Printing News Alert(3d printed diamond)

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A Swedish engineering group has 3D printed the world’s first composite diamond.
According to Mikael Schuisky, Head of R&D and Operations at Sandvik Additive Manufacturing, and RAPID + TCT show in Detroit, “Diamond is harder than anything else in nature. It is a key component in a large range of wear resistant tools in the industry, but since it’s so hard and complicated to machine it is almost impossible to form complex shapes. To solve this, Sandvik has developed a proprietary process making it possible to 3D print diamond composite, meaning that this super-hard material now can be printed in highly complex shapes – and can thereby revolutionize the way industries use the hardest natural material on the planet.
We now have the ability to create strong diamond composites in very complex shapes through additive manufacturing, which fundamentally will change the way industries will be able to use this material. As of now, the only limit to how this super-hard material can be shaped and used is down to the designer’s imagination.
According to Susanne Norgren, Adjunct Professor in Applied Materials Science at Uppsala University, “Sandvik’s 3D printed diamond composite is a true innovation. It means that we can begin to use diamond in applications and shapes never conceived possible before. Just imagine what it could do to industries, when it is possible to print anything, in any shape – in the diamond.”

https://www.home.sandvik/en/news-and-media

https://www.additive.sandvik/diamond

https://www.uu.se/en

HRE3D+ 3D Printed Titanium Wheel

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HRE3D+ 3D Printed Titanium Wheel. They first started 16 pounds for a 20-inch wheel, and 19 pounds for a 21-inch.
According to HRE President/CEO Alan Peltier, “We’re proud to be breaking new ground in wheel manufacturing with the updated HRE3D+ wheels. HRE utilize the brand’s 3D-printed multiple additive manufacturing systems ‘Direct Metal Laser Melting’ (DMLM). Working with GE Additive has given us access to some truly cutting-edge technology, and we’re exploring the future of wheel technology together with tools that will continue to evolve over the next few years. We can’t wait to see what we’re able to accomplish next”.

https://www.hrewheels.com/store

 

UAE’s first 3D-printed knee replacements

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UAE’s first 3D-printed knee replacements. According to Dr. Matthias Honl, he has been using the technology since 2008 in Austria and a consultant orthopedic surgeon and head of the Joint Replacement Unit at Burjeel Hospital for Advanced Surgery, Dubai, “The procedure is simple and makes use of a CT scan to size up the patient’s knee before the implant is even manufactured. It then prints a wax mold of the implant based on the dimensions of the patient’s knee, which is used as a model for the implant itself. I am happy that the technology found its way to be available for our patients in the Gulf region.
Both patients complained of extreme pain. After assessing their condition, we decided to have customized knees for each of them, using 3D technology”.

https://www.burjeelspecialty.com/

http://www.arabnews.com