Month: April 2018

3-D Printed Food And Your Health

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Jin-Kyu Rhee, associate professor at Ewha Woman’s University in South Korea. She described her work at the American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology’s annual meeting. This meeting is called,” EXPERIMENTAL BIOLOGY 2018,” was held April 21-25 in San Diego.

Imagine a home appliance that, at the push of a button, turns powdered ingredients into food that meets the individual nutrition requirements of each household member. Although it may seem like something from science fiction, new research aimed at using 3-D printing to create customized food could one day make this a reality.

The Research Team built a platform that uses 3-D printing to create food micro structures that allow food texture and body absorption to be customized on a personal level. One day, people could have cartridges that contain powdered versions of various ingredients that would be put together using 3-D printing and cooked according to the user’s needs or preferences.

3-D printing of food works much like 3-D printing of other materials in that layers of raw material are deposited to build up a final product. In addition to offering customized food options, the ability to 3-D print food at home or on an industrial scale could greatly reduce food waste and the cost involved with storage and transportation. It might also help meet the rapidly increasing food needs of a growing world population.:)

https://www.eurekalert.org/pub_releases/2018-04/eb2-3pf041318.php

http://www.ewha.ac.kr/mbs/ewhakr/index.jsp

http://experimentalbiology.org/2018/Home.aspx

https://medkit.info/2018/04/24/3-d-printed-food-could-change-how-we-eat/

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3D Printed bionic hand

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The 3D printing’s kindness has really opened the doors to many possibilities.
Bionics company developing affordable, assistive devices that enhance the human body. They have started the Hero Arm, a stylish multi-grip bionic hand. Current upper limb prostheses exist as hooks, grippers, or expensive bionic hands. We’re on a mission to make beautiful bionic limbs more accessible.

“So the open bionics team wanted to build assistive devices that could enable people to have more freedom and independence. And team wanted these devices to be really affordable. So at the moment, there’s this amazing bionic technology that exists but it’s out of reach for most patients because it’s so expensive. Around $1000 and open Bionic’s arms take roughly 40 hours to 3D print. The person’s limb is scanned with a tablet.

The design of the prosthetic is then planned out. The prosthetic is finally 3D printed.
The Bionic team wants to completely change that and make it really accessible and de-marketize a really helpful technology. So at the moment, everything is really exciting at Open Bionics because we’re gearing up to launch we’ve been trialing our bionic hands with children as young as eight.”

Open Bionics teamed up with the National Health Service in the UK. The NHS spends approximately $75 million per year on prosthetic services.

“I think the coolest thing about this is we’re working really closely with amputees not just designing a solution for them, they’re helping us design the solution. So yeah, I think it’s a really exciting time. In the very near future, we are focusing on our launch of the first 3D printed bionic limb. The cool thing about my job includes seeing people being fitted with bionic limbs for the first time and that’s a really big moment. For young children, they often don’t have access to these devices because they’re not small enough, or they’re just too expensive, so their parents can’t afford to supply them or the NHS cannot afford to supply a patient with it. So, seeing a young child being able to move fingers individually for the first time is really cool.”
“The future of prosthetic is low cost, lightweight, multi-grip, really great control. And even further in the future, it’s all about hyper-personalization.” 🙂

 

Open Bionics Homepage

http://www.businessinsider.com/open-bionics-prosthetic-arms-2018-2

3D-printing marketplace Shapeways raises a $30 million Series E.

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3D-printing marketplace Shapeways raises a $30 million Series E.
According to Gregory Kress, he is Shapeways CEO,“We can help them to market it and develop and sustain a small business”. “I see Shapeways shifting from delivering one niche of that customer experience to truly helping our creators from almost a platform perspective and allowing us to become a one-stop shop.”
“The capital will be used to accelerate company growth and launch additional services to support Shapeways’ overall vision to become the complete end-to-end platform helping creators ‘design, make, and sell,’ regardless of 3D modeling experience,”

“We’ve just hit our 10 millionth product printed, but we are just getting started; there is so much more to do,” he added more, “We want to enable more creators to reach success, and this will include supporting them through design services, manufacturing beyond just 3D printing, and helping them create small businesses.”

According to Lux Capital partner Zack Schildhorn,“The plan is to put this product creation engine in the hands of millions more, though more approachable and expansive services and Life-changing businesses will be built on this platform.”

Their first project is, “Design with Shapeways and Spring & Wonder for jewelry

collection:)

https://www.shapeways.com

https://www.yahoo.com

 

3D Print Removal Tools

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Retouch3D the perfect tool for the uncalibrated printer.

According to some of the comments. We can have 3D Printing tools for the inexpensive way. We can be creative to use an inexpensive $5 blade heated soldering iron or anything similar to Skinny solder iron.

The Fixer 3D printing CVS store sells these resin-based UV light repair pens for $10 (includes resin) no syringe needed.

We assembled some of the things for your 3D Print need.:)

 

 

Thermoset 3-D printer

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Large-scale thermoset 3-D printer. large-scale thermoset 3-D printer. This is located in Knoxville, Tenn. Project managed by the Advanced Manufacturing Office in DOE’s Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy.
Bob Vanderhoff, President, and CEO Magnum Venus Products he mentions,“Thanks to this innovation, research and development managers will be able to prototype faster and bring products to market faster.

He also includes, “Procurement departments will also enjoy shortened lead time on crucial molds – allowing for rapid deployment. This was made possible through ORNL slicing software that allows the integration of multivariate print process parameters.”

 

www.youtube.com/watch?v=RBctIWmBEN8&w=560&h=315]

The future of 3D Print fashion and imagination

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The future of 3D Print fashion and imagination.
“We are in an extremely individualistic age of fashion,” explains Michelle Finamore, curator of Fashion Arts at Boston’s Museum of Fine Arts and co-curator of the current exhibit.

3D Printed Electric Unicycle

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3D Printed Electric Unicycle

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Actually riding around at 30 km/h on a 3D printed means of transportation is pretty gnarly, if not foolhardy. So we were actually pleased when we dug deeper and discovered that [E-Mat]’s unicycle build is actually just a very nice cover and battery holder. We say “just”, but a 3D-printed design takes a couple of…

via 3D Printed Electric Unicycle — Hackaday

Disabled Wisconsin Duck walks with 3D Printed Feet

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Disabled Wisconsin Duck walks with 3D Printed Feet

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A duck named Phillip lost his feet to frostbite in Wisconsin.  He was found by a teacher Vicki Rabe-Harrison who first considered euthanizing him considering his condition.  Instead, she contacted Jason Jischke, a middle school teacher who had a 3D printer in his class.  Jason asked her not to put Phillip down.  Jason worked with his students to develop feet for Phillip.  After multiple attempts, finally they managed to 3D print feet that fit Phillip.  Phillip struggled initially with the prosthetic feet but figured out fast how to use them.  He got a second life thanks to his 3D printed feet.  Phillip now lives in Wisconsin’s Autumn Farm Sanctuary, near Lake Michigan with other duck friends.

 

http://www.independent.co.uk/news/world/americas/phillip-duck-3d-printed-feet-disabled-wisconsin-autumn-farm-animal-sanctuary-a6992656.html

 

http://www.al.com/news/index.ssf/2016/04/wisconsin_duck_named_phillip_g.html